3D printing in  medicine

Large Format for Prosthetics

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3D printing Implants

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3d printing Metal implants

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3D Printing Orthopaedic

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Medial R&D 3d printers

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Large Format for Prosthetics

Large format 3D printing for prosthetics means that artificial limbs can be printed in one piece, saving time and cost and improving fit as well. The prosthetics industry is already making good use of 3D printing, with improved performance, design, and patient satisfaction behind the technology’s widespread adoption in this sector.
Large format 3D printing allows for a great deal of customisation from one prosthetic device to another. Not only does this mean that patients can get a prosthetic that is uniquely shaped to work with their body, but that they can also try out minor alterations to find that elusive perfect fit.
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Large format 3D printing for prosthetics means that artificial limbs can be printed in one piece, saving time and cost and improving fit as well. The prosthetics industry is already making good use of 3D printing, with improved performance, design, and patient satisfaction behind the technology’s widespread adoption in this sector.
Large format 3D printing allows for a great deal of customisation from one prosthetic device to another. Not only does this mean that patients can get a prosthetic that is uniquely shaped to work with their body, but that they can also try out minor alterations to find that elusive perfect fit.

‍Large format 3D printing enables prosthetics manufacturers to create the complex organic shapes that better replicate the function of limbs and body parts. This huge improvement over traditional cutting tools used for prosthetics – which would often deliver rough shapes and inaccurate structures – has led to the industry’s almost total adoption of additive manufacturing in recent years.
Large format 3D printing significantly reduces the cost of prosthetics to manufacture. This is because individual prosthetics no longer require individual molds and iterative handwork operations to produce the intricate geometry and dimension accuracy that is required. This is time-consuming and expensive due to resulting high labour costs.
Prosthetics produced on large format 3D printers, however, cost only a fraction of this amount and can be made quickly. This allows for doctors and their patients to try different variations of their prosthetic until they find the perfect fit. Previously, it was far too costly to produce prosthetics that would not be used, even if this resulted in a poor experience for the rest of the patient’s life.
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3D printing Implants

3D printing for medical implants is now a booming health sector. This is due to advances in materials design increasing the range of materials that can be 3D printed, as well the evolution of 3D printer technology allowing for complex biological shapes to be printed at a microscopic scale.
New materials are increasing the rates of acceptance into patients’ bodies every year. Meanwhile, rapid progress in the technology is leading to more applications for 3D printed medical implants all the time. Despite only being introduced in 2007, this technology has already become a significant part of the wider implants industry today.
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3D printing for medical implants is now a booming health sector. This is due to advances in materials design increasing the range of materials that can be 3D printed, as well the evolution of 3D printer technology allowing for complex biological shapes to be printed at a microscopic scale.
New materials are increasing the rates of acceptance into patients’ bodies every year. Meanwhile, rapid progress in the technology is leading to more applications for 3D printed medical implants all the time. Despite only being introduced in 2007, this technology has already become a significant part of the wider implants industry today.

‍3D printing allows for complex designs to be created that would not have otherwise been possible with traditional implant manufacturing methods. Intricate design features like trabecular bone structures, high levels of possible customisation, and quick turnaround times are leading to more medical professionals turning to 3D printed implants for their patients.
Custom, 3D printed medical implants can help to decrease the amount of time that has to be spent in surgery. This is because a good fit that has been perfectly shaped to the patient can be implanted much faster than an off-the-shelf product that has to be made to fit around the patient
.Metal 3D printing can create jaw and cranial implants – where aesthetics is especially important for patient satisfaction. Orthopaedic implants from 3D printers accurately mimic the structural properties of real bone. 3D printing for medical implants is a fast-growing field that continues to innovate.3D printing for medical implants starts with spatial data from a patient scan, such as a computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. This spatial data can be imported into CAD software, and the custom implant is designed based off of it. This means that patients get medical implants where every contour is specifically designed to fit their body.
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3d printing Metal implants

High performance metals like titanium have been used for medical implants for decades now. Applying metal 3D printing to this results in customised, individual implants that can give patients the best possible fit and overall experience.3D printed, metal implants also lead to less time spent in surgery, as doctors can more easily ensure the patient’s body accepts an implant that fits well than an off-the-shelf design that does not quite fit.
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High performance metals like titanium have been used for medical implants for decades now. Applying metal 3D printing to this results in customised, individual implants that can give patients the best possible fit and overall experience.3D printed, metal implants also lead to less time spent in surgery, as doctors can more easily ensure the patient’s body accepts an implant that fits well than an off-the-shelf design that does not quite fit

‍Traditional metal implants can lead to stress shielding. This is the phenomenon in which metal implants lead to a reduction in bone density by removing typical stresses from the patient’s bone. Stress shielding can lead to fractures and dislocation of the now weakened bones.
3D printed metal implants can overcome this problem by designing implants that more perfectly match the contours of the patient’s bones. The resulting perfect fit between implant and bone reduces the effects of stress shielding by applying a more natural mechanical pressure to the bone.
This also reduces the likelihood of the implant migrating away from the bone. Ultimately, bone-implant fusion is improved by the close fit that metal 3D printing allows. This also means that the surgical procedure is shorter, there is a reduced risk of reoperation, and a greater change of a speedy recovery.
New biocompatible metal materials have become available for metal 3D printers in recent years. These add another layer of possibilities for metal implant manufacturers and producers. Smaller and faster machines can now produce patient-specific implants in a fraction of the time that traditional methods would allow.
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3D Printing Orthopaedic

3D printing for orthopaedics can result in better fits for patients, better patient comfort, and simpler and quicker surgical procedures. Fully customisable bone implants can be manufactured quickly, and their perfect fit with patients’ bodies makes the patient much more likely to adopt the implant well.3D printing is uniquely able to mimic bone structures, as well as allowing manufacturers to define mechanical strengths and implant density according to precise values. This means that 3D printed orthopaedic implants and replacement joints are as close as possible to real bone.
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3D printing for orthopaedics can result in better fits for patients, better patient comfort, and simpler and quicker surgical procedures. Fully customisable bone implants can be manufactured quickly, and their perfect fit with patients’ bodies makes the patient much more likely to adopt the implant well.3D printing is uniquely able to mimic bone structures, as well as allowing manufacturers to define mechanical strengths and implant density according to precise values. This means that 3D printed orthopaedic implants and replacement joints are as close as possible to real bone.

‍3D printing can create porous parts which are highly valuable to the orthopaedic implants sectors. Porosity allows for better osseointegration – fusing between the bone and the artificial implant – which enables implants to become inherent parts of the patient’s body. This happens when bone grows inside the pores of the implant’s surface. With 3D printing, the level of porosity – size and distribution of pores – can be precisely calibrated to ensure the best chance of the patient accepting the implant into their body.
3D printing also enables trabecular bone structures to be mimicked throughout the internal structure of the orthopaedic implant. Trabecular bone structure is relatively spongy and porous, and has traditionally been difficult for implant manufacturers to mimic. Spongy coatings have typically been applied, but these risk delamination and ultimate failure. 3D printed orthopaedic implants can mimic trabecular structure throughout the implant, resulting in a stronger implant with less risk of delamination in the future.
Manufacturers can now work with complex biomedical data to create orthopaedic implants with the same density and mechanical properties as the bone that they are replacing. This results in implants which patients can more easily accept as a part of their body, and which the body more readily accepts biologically as well.
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Medical R&D 3d printers

3D printing is also capable of assisting in the research and development of medical practice, by producing bespoke guides, models, and tools for procedures that require high levels of precision and patient customisation. These are machines that are well suited to research, for example by teaching medical students in higher education, and producing replicas of a patient's body for surgical planning.
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3D printing has been at the heat of developments in commercial research and development (R&D) since its early days in the 1980s. Now, 3D printing for medical R&D is a growing field offering cutting-edge innovation to the medical fields.
Beyond implants and prosthetics, medical 3D printing is also seeing use in education, modelling, tooling, and surgical planning. The advantages of 3D printing – high speed, low cost, and hands-on innovation – are highly desired in medical engineering, and so the technology is on the rise in this sector.

‍In medical R&D, 3D printing can enable rapid prototyping and multiple reiterations to get the best possible design locked in before commencing with expensive manufacturing. Designers can also quickly find and fix problems, create custom manufacturing jigs and parts, and communicate physical concepts with stakeholders.
Outside of medical manufacturing, 3D printing can also be used as a powerful education tool. Anatomical models can help to enrich learning for medical students and patients alike.
Surgical planning has also seen the benefits of 3D printing. In this application, surgeons can recreate parts of the patient’s unique anatomy (using data from scans) and visualise the surgery they are about to perform. This reduces time spent in surgery as well as minimising the risk of mistakes or complications occurring during surgery.
Recently, medical 3D printing has helped to save lives and tackle the global coronavirus pandemic. Individuals, groups, and major manufacturers have used 3D printers to create sensors, masks, and other vital medical equipment for the fight against COVID-19.
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Super-deduction

For expenditure incurred from 1 April 2021 until the end of March 2023, companies can claim 130% capital allowances on qualifying 3D Printer and Scanner investments.

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